Guinness T Shirts Wooden Sign

There are so many images associated with Guinness – animals like the toucan and seal, pints of dark stout with a creamy head, illustrations of strength and many more.

In the beginning, before SH Benson and John Gilroy, the Guinness adverts were simple, elegant and straight forward. They often featured replications of the trademark labels of the bottlers.

Guinness_Trademark_Label

While not as whimsical, this earlier artwork does lend itself to many items celebrating Guinness. This includes Guinness tee shirts.

There are so many delightful t shirts available. I particularly like the artwork on the line of which this wooden sign t shirt is included.

Guinness T Shirts Wooden Sign

It is reminiscent of the wall-mounting barrel ends and the trademark labels of the bottlers. And although it depicts an image that is from an earlier era, its artistic flair gives it a modern twist.

The image is screen printed onto heavyweight preshrunk 6oz. cotton to give you a comfortable and stylish shirt.

Check it out and see what you think!

Cheers!
Guinness Collectables

Guinness Wooden Sign T-Shirt

Lovely Day for a Guinness

Guinness Toucan 1955

Guinness Toucan

The toucan was first introduced to Guinness advertising in 1935. The whimsical characterture was created by the artist John Gilroy under the SH Benson agency. The very first poster showed the toucan smiling over two pints of Guinness. The ad copy said:

If he can say as you can
Guinness is good for you
How grand to be a Toucan
Just think what Toucan can do
~ Dorothy L. Sayers

The toucan was widely featured in the 1950’s and was used is their campaign until the early 1980’s.

This “Lovely Day for a Guinness” poster was released in 1955. In this version of Gilroy’s toucan, he used a more comical rendition than in later years.

Lovely Day for a Guinness
You can buy a rendition of this classic poster embossed on metal to add to your Guinness bar room collection. Get your Lovely Day for Guinness Tin Sign

Cheers,

Guinness Collectables

Smiling Guinness

There’s Nothing Like a Guinness

Smiling Guinness Advert
SH Benson was hired as the first advertising agency for Guinness in 1927. They saw this as quite an opportunity and did everything they could to make sure the inaugural advertising campaign was a great success.

They toured the Guinness Brewery in Dublin studying every step of the brewing process. They went to pubs and asked Guinness drinkers what they liked about the brew and why they drank it.

After all was said and done they came up with a simple slogan that lasted until the late 1960’s – “Guinness is Good for You”.

In addition to establishing brand awareness, this slogan led to the creation to some of the best poster adverts of all time.

One of the posters printed in 1938 featured a characterture of a pint glass of Guinness with a smiling face embedded in the foamy head of the stout, its mouth open accepting the last drop from a bottle of the brew.

This poster has been beautifully replicated in the retro Guinness Smiling Pint Metal Sign shown above. Get your very own Guinness Smiling Pint Tin Sign

Cheers,

Guinness Collectables

Pouring the “Perfect Pint”

The other night I went down to my local here in Coronado to have a pint and spend some time with my good friend Robby, who also happens to be the bartender at the Coronado Golf Course Bar & Grill.

I ordered a Guinness and Robby poured it as he always does with the love and attention it deserves. Not only is he a native of Dublin, he has been trained by the distributors of Guinness how to pour the perfect pint. This training is something that Guinness insists upon for bartenders everywhere serving Guinness.

As he was letting it rest, waiting for the finishing touch, he shared an amusing story of a gentleman that came in a few years back. The bar was quiet at the time with few patrons and he ordered a Guinness.

Robby poured the glass to the bottom of the harp and left it to settle the required time. The gentleman started to get agitated and became irate shouting, “This is the worst service I’ve ever had!”

Robby thought he was putting him on, but the man left in a huff! Hopefully by now, this poor bloke has come to realize the error of his ways.

There are many opinions are how to pour the perfect pint, but this video explains how to do it the way they do it at the source

Cheers,

Guinness Collectables

Guinness for Strength Pub Glasses

Guinness for Strength steel worker

Although they are not technically a Guinness collectable just yet, I discovered these great Guinness pub glasses the other day that would be a great addition to your Guinness collection.

The traditional Guinness glass is my favorite beer glass. The shape of course was designed for the ultimate Guinness experience. An added bonus is the way it sits just right in your hand.

But now there are more choices in Guinness barware. There are three sets of new pub glasses featuring old Guinness ads. The first set of four glasses features the Guinness workers series.

The worker series is based on the “Guinness for Strength” campaign of the early 1930s.  This was another slant to the “Guinness is good for you” catch phrase.

The “Guinness for Strength” ads featured working class men with exaggerated physical prowess engaging in some traditional working class jobs.  They included a super-strong girder carrier, a wood cutter, a laborer and a farmer.

The man with the girder became the poster child for the entire campaign. In the original ad, the workingman is wearing a flat cap and carrying an enormous steel girder above his head on the fingertips of one hand. The end of the girder is in the top right hand corner of the page and it appears that the man has the strength to lift him and the girder right off of the page. The phrase “Guinness for Strength” is written out in large red letters against an off-white background.

The ads were aimed at the workingman. The masculine images of strength combined with the suggestion of a strong work ethic was meant to reflect on both the physical and the moral character of those who drank Guinness. The message was that Guinness was a reward for those who spent their days toiling and laboring for their families and it was also good for them.

Next up, the harassed zookeeper and his menagerie of animals series.

In the meantime, go ahead and add the “Guinness for Strength” pub glasses to your collection!

Guinness Collectables

Although they are not technically a Guinness collectable just yet, I discovered these great Guinness pub glasses the other day that would be a great addition to your Guinness collection.

The traditional Guinness glass is my favorite beer glass. The shape of course was designed for the ultimate Guinness experience. An added bonus is the way it sits just right in your hand.

But now there are more choices in Guinness barware. There are three sets of new pub glasses featuring old Guinness ads. The first set of four glasses features the Guinness workers series.

The worker series is based on the “Guinness for Strength” campaign of the early 1930s.  This was another slant to the “Guinness is good for you” catch phrase.

The “Guinness for Strength” ads featured working class men with exaggerated physical prowess engaging in some traditional working class jobs.  They included a super-strong girder carrier, a wood cutter, a laborer and a farmer.

The man with the girder became the poster child for the entire campaign. In the original ad, the workingman is wearing a flat cap and carrying an enormous steel girder above his head on the fingertips of one hand. The end of the girder is in the top right hand corner of the page and it appears that the man has the strength to lift him and the girder right off of the page. The phrase “Guinness for Strength” is written out in large red letters against an off-white background.

The ads were aimed at the workingman. The masculine images of strength combined with the suggestion of a strong work ethic was meant to reflect on both the physical and the moral character of those who drank Guinness. The message was that Guinness was a reward for those who spent their days toiling and laboring for their families and it was also good for them.

Next up, the harassed zookeeper and his menagerie of animals series.

In the meantime, go ahead and add the “Guinness for Strength” pub glasses to your collection!

Guinness Recipes – a Guinness dessert

Guinness recipes - Guinness Cupcakes

If you are reading this blog, there is a very good chance you are open minded about trying anything that has Guinness as an ingredient.

One Guinness recipe is for a drink. In some places is not necessarily well accepted because of its name, “The Irish Car Bomb”.

In case you are not familiar with it, you start by filling a shot glass with a ½ shot each of Jamison’s Irish whiskey and Bailey’s Irish Cream. The filled shot glass is then dropped into a ¾ filled pint glass of Guinness ale.

The object is to drink it straight away. I have tried it and must say while the flavors do work well together, it’s not exactly an experience to savor.

This brings us to the point of this post, which is a Guinness dessert recipe for cupcakes that include all three ingredients in the drink: whiskey, Bailey’s and Guinness. The addition of chocolate to this trilogy is a match made in heaven.

Give this one a try and I am sure you will not be disappointed! Come back and let us know in the comments what you think of these tasty cakes.

Guinness Irish Car Bomb Cupcakes ~ Makes 24 cupcakes

Guinness Chocolate Cupcakes
1 cup Guinness stout
1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter
3/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
2 cups all purpose flour
2 cups sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons baking soda
3/4 teaspoon salt
2 large eggs
2/3 cup sour cream

Ganache Filling
8 ounces bittersweet chocolate
2/3 cup heavy cream
2 tablespoons butter, room temperature
1 to 2 teaspoons Irish whiskey

Baileys Frosting
3 to 4 cups confections sugar
1 stick (1/2 cup or 4 ounces) unsalted butter, at room temperature
3 to 4 tablespoons Baileys

Make the cupcakes: Preheat oven to 350°F. Line 24 cupcake cups with liners. Bring 1 cup stout and 1 cup butter to simmer in heavy large saucepan over medium heat. Add cocoa powder and whisk until mixture is smooth. Cool slightly.

Whisk together the flour, sugar, baking soda, and 3/4 teaspoon salt in a large bowl. Using an electric mixer, beat the eggs and sour cream together in another large bowl. Add the stout-chocolate mixture to the egg mixture and beat just enough to combine. Add the flour mixture and beat briefly on slow speed. Using rubber spatula, fold batter until completely combined.

Divide batter among cupcake liners, filling them 2/3 to 3/4 of the way. Bake cake until tester inserted into center comes out clean, about 17 minutes. Cool cupcakes completely on a rack.

Make the ganache filling: Chop the chocolate and transfer it to a heatproof bowl. Heat the cream until simmering and pour it over the chocolate. Let it sit for one minute and then stir until smooth. (If this has not sufficiently melted the chocolate, you can place the bowl over boiling water in a double-boiler to gently melt what remains. Alternately, you can also microwave it for 20 seconds in the microwave.) Add the butter and whiskey and stir until combined.

Fill the cupcakes: Let the ganache cool until thick but still soft enough to be piped. If you want to speed up the cooling process, you can place the bowl in the refrigerator, stirring it every 10 minutes.

Meanwhile, using a 1-inch round cookie cutter or an apple corer, cut the centers out of the cooled cupcakes. Cut about 2/3 of the way down – do not cut through to the bottom. Use a slim spoon or grapefruit knife to get the center out.

Put the ganache into a piping bag with a wide tip and fill the holes in each cupcake to the top.

Make the frosting: Whip the butter in the bowl of an electric mixer until it is light and fluffy. Slowly add the powdered sugar, a few tablespoons at a time.

When the frosting looks thick enough to spread, drizzle in the Baileys and whip it until combined.

Ice the cupcakes. You may also decorate them with shaved dark and white chocolates.

Tip: You can bake the cupcakes a week or two in advance and store them, well wrapped, in the freezer. You can also fill them before you freeze them. They also keep filled — or filled and frosted — in the fridge for a day.

Guinness Collectables